Fruit Glass

Ginger Sorbet with Orange Glass & Citrus Mist

GInger 1 - done


Please enjoy this recipe and video from my new book ‘Vibrant Vegetarian’. The full recipe is featured bellow along with a video.

Vibrant Vegetarian is out now, I hope you enjoy this sample recipe and video and if so check out the whole book - available via iTunes and iBooks

Cheers

Eddie



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Ginger Sorbet with Citrus Mist



This is a really refreshing end of meal dessert.
Citrus and ginger with coriander give a bright, clean flavour.
The orange glass gives the dish a little texture and yet more vivid citrus flavour.

The exclamation point to the dish comes in the form of the sensory impact of the citrus mist, both aromatically and visually dramatic.

I think this makes for a beautiful way to end a meal - light and vibrant. It’s a dish in which both the flavour and presentation are memorable and elegant.

Ginger Sorbet

250g Caster sugar
400g Water
70g Grated ginger
Juice and zest of one lemon
40g Cointreau
1.5g Xanthan gum

Squeeze the grated ginger in cheese cloth to extract as much juice as possible. Set the ginger juice to one side and keep the grated ginger solids separately.
Heat the water and sugar in a pan with the grated ginger solids. Simmer for five minutes.
Now strain the hot liquid into a bowl to remove all the solids. Add the ginger juice, cointreau, lemon juice and zest into the hot liquid and then allow the mixture to cool.

Once the liquid has cooled blend in the xanthan gum, then allow the liquid to chill for a couple of hours in the fridge.
Pour a little of the chilled sorbet base into a metal bowl. Then fast freeze the sorbet by whisking in powdered dry ice (or place the chilled liquid into an ice cream machine and churn while it freezes) then store this in a sealed plastic tub in the freezer.
NOTE – Dry ice is very cold (-78°C) so should be used with caution, and ensure no pieces of dry ice remain in the sorbet when it is served.

Orange Glass

170g Fresh orange juice
20g Lemon juice
10g Cointreau
Zest of two lemons
20g Kuzu
30g Caster sugar
10g Isomalt
½ Teaspoon chopped dried safflower petals


Mix all ingredients except the safflower petals together and stir well.
Now heat this mix while stirring until it thickens and turns translucent.
Take the mixture off the heat and stir in the chopped safflower.

Spread this mixture thinly thin on a non stick sheet.
Dehydrate at 64°C for 14 hours (or in a low oven for the same amount of time or until crisp).
Store the orange glass in an airtight container with silica until ready to serve.

Citrus Mist

500ml Water
Juice and zest of three lemons
One bunch of fresh chopped coriander
20 Crushed cardamom pods
2 Sticks of lemongrass
10 Dried kaffir lime leaves
One piece of chopped ginger


Heat all the ingredients in a small pan and simmer for five minutes.
Then turn off the heat and leave covered to infuse.
Store the citrus infusion in the fridge.

Serving
Spoon a little dry ice into a bowl and cover this over with slices of lemon and orange.
Spoon some of the sorbet into a glass and sit this on top of the lemons in the bowl.
Place a piece of the orange glass in the top of the sorbet and garnish with coriander.
Finally pour the citrus infusion over the dry ice and the emerging mist will carry the citrus scent adding a final layer of flavour to the dish.


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Grape Amuse Bouche

P1010025_2Carbonated Anti-griddle ‘Seared’ Grapes - Purple Grape Glass - Fennel Sugar Strands

This dish is a celebration of grapes, with just a couple of simple complimentary flavours.

The ‘Purple Grape Glass’ is brittle and delicate but delivers an intense, lingering flavour. The fizzy, carbonated grapes are refreshing and palate cleansing, cutting the sweetness of the sugar strands. They also have a solid, then smooth and yielding, fast frozen edge. Finally the fragile, crisp, crunchy fennel sugar stands provide an extra hit of sweetness along with the distinctive and complementary flavour of anise.

This recipe uses fantastic bit of kit called an ‘Anti-griddle’. Its available on the
www.Modernist-Chef.com shop. It’s an amazing piece of modern kitchen equipment made by PolyScience, with a ‘griddle’ surface which chills down to bellow -35C . The anti-griddle allows you to freeze items incredibly quickly (thus giving you a smoother texture as ice-crystals don’t have time to form) and to freeze objects upwards from the ‘griddle’ surface by increment, allowing you to achieve unique textures and temperature contrasts within elements of a dish.

In this recipe the cut edges of halved carbonated grapes are frozen on the anti griddle. The top three quarters each grape stays soft and unfrozen so you keep the taste and texture of fresh grapes (with an added fizz). But you also get a texture and temperature contrast within each grape, and a really bright clean flavour from the frozen edge.

Whippers and The AntiGriddle available from www.Modernist-Chef.com


Grape glass
Above - The Purple Grape Glass

Purple Grape Glass

165g Purple Grape Juice
40g Pure-cote B790
15g Caster Sugar
5g Icing Sugar
Tiny Pinch of Salt
0.5g Ground Cinnamon
15g Freshly Squeezed Lime Juice (roughly equal to the juice of half a small lime)

Slowly heat all ingredients except the lime juice to 90C in a small pan whilst whisking, and hold the mixture at 90C for two to three minutes, continually stirring.

Remove the pan from the heat and pour the liquid into a blender, now adding the fresh lime juice. Blend the hot mix for ten minutes on full power.

Now dab a small amount of olive oil on to a couple of sheets of acetate and wipe with paper towel to form a very light coating.

Pour the warm grape juice mix onto the acetate sheets and form as thin a layer of the juice mix as possible by moving the sheets around.

Place the acetate sheets into a dehydrator ser at 33C for 3 -4 hours until the juice mixture has become a malleable but dry film. (The coated acetate can be left at room temperature to dry overnight but I find this low temperature stage in the dehydrator works well and speeds up the process).

Peel the grape film away from the acetate and shape the film as desired. For this dish I tore small pieces of the film and simply crumpled them up a little, pinning then in that shape with transparent cocktail sticks.

Finally dehydrate the shaped grape film on baking paper at 57C for 10-12 hours until you are left with crisp and brittle, abstract shaped, pieces of purple grape glass on cocktail sticks.

(These can be stored in an airtight container - layering with baking paper along with a small wrap of silica crystals to prevent the fruit glass from absorbing moisture).

Fennel Sugar Strands

40g Isomalt
20g Glucose Syrup
20g White Fondant
0.75g Ground Toasted Fennel Seeds (about ¾ of a teaspoon)

Heat all the ingredients except the ground fennel to 165C in pan.

Once the sugar mixture hits 165C remove the pan from heat and let it rest for a few seconds, then quickly stir in the fennel powder. (The mixture should be clear and uncoloured except for the fine fennel powder suspended in it).

Pour the hot sugar mixture onto a silicon mat (such as a Silpat)

As soon as the sugar is cool enough to touch, but still flexible, pull and stretch thin pieces of the ‘caramel’ into long, fine abstract shapes, working quickly.

You want a variety of shapes – some small flatter pieces and some long thin strands of sugar. Allow the fennel sugar strands to cool and harden on baking paper.

(As with the fruit glass these can be stored in an airtight container – layered with baking paper along with a small wrap of silica crystals to prevent the sugar stands from absorbing moisture).

For the Grapes

A mix of good quality Green and Red seedless grapes
Two Co2 chargers

Take about 20 mixed grapes and cut them in half.

Place the halved grapes into a
cream whipper and charge it with two Co2 chargers. Then place the whipper in the fridge and chill for at least two hours.

Complete the following steps once you are ready to serve the dish (and have prepared the Fennel Sugar strands and Grape Glass)

Lightly oil the surface of the anti-griddle and turn it on around ten minutes before your ready to use it so it can fully chill down to temperature.

Now, when you have everything prepared, fully vent the gas from the cream whipper, then carefully open it up and remove the grapes.

Place the grapes, cut side down on the lightly oiled anti-griddle. Allow the cut edge of the grapes to freeze and the freezing to continue up the grape by about a 2-3mm (this will happen very quickly)

When the grapes are frozen at the base remove them from anti-griddle surface with a silicon spatula. This should be done as close to serving as possible so that the edge of the grape remains frozen whilst the rest is fresh and fizzy from carbonation.

Putting it together

Alternately place the prepared grapes and some of the smaller pieces of fennel sugar in a small shot glass.

Arrange a couple of the longer thin strands of fennel sugar protruding from the shot glass.

Finally take one of the pieces of purple grape glass on its cocktail stick and gently press the tip of the cocktail stick into one of the grapes in the shot glass, so that the purple grape glass sits above the shot glass.